• Sales 0808 1686 777
  • Support 0333 0142 700

One website, multiple domains?

One website, multiple domains

Your domain says a lot about you. It’s your address on the internet, the place people go to find you, and a name intrinsically associated with your brand.

But is one domain name enough? It’s easy to overlook once your website is up and running, but having several domains offers a number of clear advantages.

Lock down your brand with multiple domains

First and foremost, you’ll want to secure your brand. If you’re a UK-based business with a local focus, it makes perfect sense that .co.uk would be your first choice. But you may still want to present your company on a global stage, and for that .com is the domain that people recognise and trust worldwide.

It’s not just about prestige, though. Think about it this way: if you don’t register your company name with .com, who will? The unfortunate reality is that fraudsters are always looking for ways to exploit legitimate businesses.

We previously discussed typosquatting, the practice of registering a domain to deny it from other parties. The squatters’ end-goals can vary: sometimes they simply want to sell the domain at a grossly inflated price; sometimes the domain forms part of a more complex scam.

URL hijacking or “brandjacking” is a more advanced form of typosquatting where the squatters register an existing business name with a different domain extension, or perhaps with a slightly different spelling, to fool users into divulging valuable information that can be exploited in subsequent cybercrimes.

In this context, it becomes essential to register your brand name with multiple domains, and even with slight variations and misspellings. This way, you stay 100% in control of how your brand is perceived, and prevent anyone else from damaging your reputation through malicious activity.

Don’t miss out on type-in traffic

“Type-in traffic” refers to all those users who simply type an address into the URL bar – no search engines, no bookmarks, just a flurry of (not always totally coordinated) typing.

From typos and misremembered brand names to generic descriptions in the vague hope of a website actually existing, type-in traffic comes from diverse sources – and very much encourages the use of multiple domains.

Maybe a user doesn’t remember your company name, but they do remember a specific product or service you offer. Or maybe they just assume every product will have its own URL. In these circumstances, it’s vital to have the right domains in place to hoover up all that type-in traffic.

Ensuring you catch type-in traffic will also help protect you from the typosquatting threats mentioned previously. Just like how Google has gogle.com and googel.com, and at Fasthosts we have fastgosts.co.uk and fasthost.co.uk, you should look to secure all the likely variations of your domain.

Multiple domains, SEO and 301 redirects

Do multiple domains help SEO? The short answer: probably not, at least not directly. Of course, more domains usually mean more ways for users to find you, and hopefully more traffic – in the long term, this should help boost your SEO, even if multiple domains aren’t a direct ranking factor.

Search engines have long since gotten wise to that old SEO tactic of bulk-buying keyword-stuffed domains for a single site. Doing that today could actually end up harming your SEO, since Google punishes sites featuring duplicate content.

This brings us to perhaps a more pressing question: can multiple domains hurt your SEO in any way? The good news is that multiple domains shouldn’t damage the SEO ranking of a site, provided they’re set up in a way that meets the search engine’s approval.

301 redirects are the way to go when linking additional domains to your site. By having one primary domain and forwarding everything else via 301 redirects, you ensure that Google only sees one website, not multiple copies, so you won’t be penalised for duplicate content.

301 redirects also have the advantage of passing the vast majority of a domain’s existing SEO ranking power, or “link equity”, to the site it forwards to. So in cases where you have existing domains with previously accrued SEO value, there absolutely is a benefit in linking those URLs to your main site – just remember to do it with 301 redirects.

The UK family: is a .uk reserved for you?

As the established standard for British businesses, .co.uk is popular throughout the country. But with the launch of the .uk domain, there’s an alternative. Short and simple, .uk is ideal for giving your site a global, fresh feel – and if you already have a UK domain, you could have a .uk specially reserved for you.

The UK family of domains includes .co.uk, .me.uk and .org.uk. And now, .uk domains have been reserved for owners of equivalent UK web addresses. So why not register a .uk and link it to your existing .co.uk site? Until 10th June 2019, you’re first in line.

Thinking about expanding your domain portfolio? When it comes to multiple registration of domains, choosing the right registrar makes a big difference. At Fasthosts, we make it easy to register domains and manage large numbers of them via our convenient and user-friendly control panel. Alongside great prices, we provide comprehensive customer support for all your domain, email and web hosting queries. Contact us for more details on how we can help.

Neal Thoms's picture

Neal Thoms

Author As a content creator for Fasthosts, Neal’s main focus is cloud technology and how it’s transforming everything we do online. He’s worked in the web hosting industry for over five years.